What does each MBTI personality type value most?

What does each MBTI personality type value most?

What does each Myers-Briggs personality type find most valuable?

Before you scroll down to find your MBTI personality type, take a few minutes for some self-reflection.

If I ask you what you value most in life, you could probably come up with a few things right off the top of your head. Family and friends are usually one of the first things people say. But there are also things that we forget, or are embarrassed to say that we value.

Money is one example. Most people won’t say they value money, however when it  comes to comfort and financial security (things money can often provide), those things often are valuable to us.

Maybe you have a good idea of what you value, but you’re not exactly happy with where your life is right now. Perhaps it feels like something is missing? Many times, what people value most isn’t the same as where they’re spending their time, their money or their effort.

Being happy with different parts of your life

I had a life coach once who did this great exercise with me. We made a list of 8 areas of life (below), and she explained roughly what each area meant. Then as homework I filled in how happy I was in that part of my life.

 

Take a look at the list of 8 parts of life below*:

  • Career/business (what you do with your time to make money)
  • Finances/wealth (how you manage money)
  • Friends & family (relationships)
  • Fun, recreation or entertainment (guiltless, earned pleasure)
  • Health and fitness (nutrition, exercise and mental health)
  • Love life (romantic relationships)
  • Personal/spiritual development (things you want to develop just for you)
  • Physical environment (where you live and work and physically spend your time)

First, look at each of these areas of life and ask yourself what you’re happy or unhappy with?

Second, ask yourself what you could do to increase your satisfaction in this part of your life? Do you need to invest more time or effort into a certain area? Why do you feel like you’re unsatisfied with this part of your life?

Next, make a goal for yourself to improve your life satisfaction.

Pick just one area to start. Now set a specific, measurable goal for yourself that you’re going to do this week to improve that part of your life.

Your life and your values

This is a great exercise to be able to look at the different parts of your life and see what you’re satisfied with compared to where you’re spending time and energy. However, what you value most could sit in different parts of your life.

In other words, what you value and where you make time for that value in your life aren’t always the same.

For example, if you value being creative you could focus on that value by spending more time with your kids and being creative with them – building things or using your imagination for astronaut-moon-landings or pirate fights.

Or you could find that your value of creativity isn’t being focused on at work, where previously that was a huge outlet for you (but roles at your work have changed and that’s no longer part of your job).

Knowing how satisfied you are with each part of your life is a great first step.

But comparing that with your values, and seeing where those values are being satisfied in your life (or maybe they’re not being satisfied at all) goes a long way to creating a better life for yourself.

What each MBTI type finds most valuable

The information below is based on data from the national representative sample; see MBTI® Manual, page 314. The values list included:

  • Home and family
  • Health
  • Financial security
  • Relationships/friendships
  • Autonomy, freedom, independence
  • Achievement and accomplishment
  • Religion or spirituality
  • Education, learning
  • Being creative; community service
  • Prestige or status

Here’s what our normative sample of Myers-Briggs personality type finds most valuable, ranked from the list above:

INTJ

  1. Health
  2. Home/family
  3. Achievement
  4. Autonomy
  5. Financial security

INTP

  1. Autonomy
  2. Home/family
  3. Health
  4. Financial security
  5. Friendships

ESTJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Financial security
  4. Achievement
  5. Friendships

ESFP

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Friendships
  4. Financial security
  5. Achievement

ENFJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Friendships
  4. Financial security
  5. Learning

INFP

  1. Home/family
  2. Autonomy
  3. Health
  4. Friendships
  5. Financial security

ISFP

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Financial security
  4. Friendships
  5. Autonomy

ENTJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Financial security (tie)
  4. Friendships (tie)
  5. Achievement

ESFJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Friendships
  4. Financial security
  5. Achievement

ISFJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Financial security
  4. Friendships
  5. Autonomy

ISTP

  1. Home/family
  2. Financial security
  3. Health (tie)
  4. Autonomy (tie)
  5. Friendships

ISTJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Financial security
  3. Health
  4. Autonomy
  5. Achievement

ENTP

  1. Home/family
  2. Autonomy
  3. Achievement
  4. Financial security (tie)
  5. Health (tie)

ENFP

  1. Home/family
  2. Friendships (tie)
  3. Health (tie)
  4. Autonomy
  5. Financial security

INFJ

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Friendships
  4. Financial security
  5. Autonomy

ESTP

  1. Home/family
  2. Health
  3. Financial security
  4. Friendships
  5. Autonomy

Not sure what your Myers-Briggs personality type is? Take the official MBTI assessment.

Want to read more about topics like this? Check out the blogs below:

What stresses you out based on your Myers-Briggs type

How to be happier using self-awareness and Myers-Briggs personality type

What is happiness?

What are your strengths? How to really know the answer

 

 

 

* https://www.universalcoachingsystems.com/thrive-know-your-life-areas/